How to Use HARO (And Alternatives) to Get Killer Backlinks

HARO link building has taken the SEO industry by storm over the last few years. But today, actually getting results is hard work. HARO is oversaturated, and results are not guaranteed.

So should you still try to get media coverage this way? Absolutely! There are tons of links up for grabs. Not just any links. Super high authority links that can drive traffic, leads, and sales. 

But how do you get ahead of the competition? As someone who has had great success using earned media platforms like HARO as a means of building top-notch links over the years, I’m going to give you my tips and tricks on how to get killer backlinks using HARO and alternatives.

But first, let’s get familiar with everything HARO can actually do for you.

Help a Reporter Out, or HARO from Cision, is the best-known platform for journalists’ requests. You receive daily emails

How to Find Niche Keywords for SEO in 3 Steps

Niche keywords represent clear and specific topics that appeal to relatively small, often specialized parts of a given market.

In other words, these are the “sustainable” and “recycled” jackets in the overall jacket market. 

Niche keyword examples with "jacket"

Niche keywords can be an opportunity to attract highly targeted traffic in a short time since they typically refer to specific things that don’t have a lot of competition. 

In this guide, I’ll show you how to find niche keywords with Ahrefs in three steps.

Step 1. Create an initial keyword list

Open Ahrefs’ Keywords Explorer, type in broad terms that point to certain markets, products, or interests (i.e., seed keywords), and hit enter. 

Inserting seed keywords

Then go to Matching terms and set the maximum volume and TP filters to something low for this industry, like 1000. 

Filtering for low-volume and low-TP keywords

Why these two filters? The volume filter will look for keywords with a limited number of searches, while the TP filter

How to Create an SEO Content Strategy (Follow the Ahrefs’ Framework)

SEO content is content designed to rank on search engines. So an SEO content strategy is your plan on how you’ll use that content to support your business goals.

Our SEO content strategy can be summarized into one sentence:

We create and maintain high-quality, search-focused content about topics with business potential, search traffic potential, and ranking potential.

We’ve carefully crafted this sentence. Each word has earned its way in. If you remove any one of them, everything falls apart.

Let’s look at how our content strategy works.

1. Find topics with search traffic potential

The goal of creating SEO content is to rank high on Google. That means you’ll need to target topics your potential customers are searching for. 

Here’s the quickest way to find keywords with search traffic potential:

  1. Go to Ahrefs’ Keywords Explorer
  2. Enter a few broad keywords related to your site or niche (for e.g., we can

8 Easy (But Effective) Ways to Grow Your Email List

Your email list is one of your business’s most important marketing assets. Rather than fleeting traffic from temporary social media posts or paid ads, these are people who have engaged with you and you have direct access to.

You can make money at the click of a button whenever you need to with a strong email list. Unlike other marketing channels, you have full control and ownership here.

So how do you grow your email list? We’ll go through the most effective tips and tactics I’ve learned by growing multiple email lists in the tens of thousands.

The email growth mindset you need

Before we dive into the action steps, let’s get your head straight. When it comes to growing an email list, you don’t just want as many raw numbers as possible.

Not only does this get expensive fast, it also hurts your email deliverability when you send content

How a Spoonful of Story Helps Even ‘Boring’ Content Go Down

Content practitioners create a spectrum of creative content. Some, like thought leadership e-books, entertaining videos, or customer stories, are seemingly filled with storytelling opportunities.

Then, there are the more process-oriented pieces – standards, guidelines, how-to instructions, and other initiatives that relay valuable information. Though necessary, these “constructed” pieces are rarely considered a place to stretch the creative legs.

I’ve discussed the differences between these content sets before, using my favorite quote from G.K. Chesterton’s critique of Charles Dickens’s novel The Pickwick Papers:

The whole difference between construction and creation is exactly this: that a thing constructed can only be loved after it is constructed; but a thing created is loved before it exists.

That distinction speaks directly to the excitement of creating interesting pieces vs. the satisfaction that comes after constructing something that turns out to be useful.

Most content creators prefer creating the former. I suggested in that original

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